Antibodies to CD45 and other cell membrane antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus

John B. Winfield, Philip Fernsten, Jan Czyzyk, Ena Wang, John Marchalonis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The multivalency of cold-reactive IgM anti-lymphocyte autoantibodies, together with the local density of reactive antigens on the cell surface, may confer a capacity for a variety of immunoregulatory and non-specific physiological roles in the immune system and in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Targets of interest in this regard include CD45, β2 microglobulin, and surface immunoglobulin. IgG anti-lymphocyte autoantibodies, while more difficult to study, also exhibit interesting specificities. However, whether any of the mechanisms by which anti-lymphocyte autoantibodies could alter cellular function actually obtain in vivo remains speculative. Essentially all of the data in this regard derive from experiments in which anti-lymphocyte autoantibody-containing SLE serum or plasma, or purified Ig fractions thereof, is combined with peripheral blood mononuclear cells in short-term culture in vitro. Thus, it is possible that anti-lymphocyte autoantibodies in SLE, rather than contributing to pathogenesis, reflect a physiological attempt by the immune system to restore homeostasis in the face of aggressive autoimmune stimulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-210
Number of pages10
JournalSpringer Seminars in Immunopathology
Volume16
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Autoantibodies
Cell Membrane
Lymphocytes
Antigens
Antibodies
Immune System
B-Cell Antigen Receptors
Surface Antigens
Autoimmune Diseases
Blood Cells
Homeostasis
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Antibodies to CD45 and other cell membrane antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus. / Winfield, John B.; Fernsten, Philip; Czyzyk, Jan; Wang, Ena; Marchalonis, John.

In: Springer Seminars in Immunopathology, Vol. 16, No. 2-3, 12.1994, p. 201-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winfield, John B. ; Fernsten, Philip ; Czyzyk, Jan ; Wang, Ena ; Marchalonis, John. / Antibodies to CD45 and other cell membrane antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus. In: Springer Seminars in Immunopathology. 1994 ; Vol. 16, No. 2-3. pp. 201-210.
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