Aging and Panic Disorder

Phenomenology, Comorbidity, and Risk Factors

Javaid Sheikh, Pamela J. Swales, Eve B. Carlson, Steve E. Lindley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The authors compared young and older adults with panic disorder (PD) to investigate differences in panic-associated phenomenology, psychiatric comorbidity, and risk factors. Method: Patients in the older group (age 60 and above) were further subdivided into early- and late-onset groups and compared. Phenomenology (number of panic symptoms, severity of anxiety, physiological symptoms, panic-associated cognitions, and overall severity of PD); comorbidity (depressive and anxiety disorders); and risk factors (family history of anxiety and life stressors) were assessed in 167 outpatients with PD. Results: Older patients reported fewer panic symptoms, less anxiety and arousal, less severe PD, lower levels of depression, and higher levels of functioning. Furthermore, within the older-patient group, late-onset patients were found to report less distress during panic attacks in relation to body sensations and panic-related cognitions and emotions. Multiple-regression analysis of the entire sample showed that chronological age and age at onset of PD distinctly predicted different domains of panic phenomenology. Conclusion: PD was consistently less severe in older patients across multiple domains, and a later age at onset was associated with less distress due to body sensations, cognitions, and emotions during panic attacks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-109
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Panic Disorder
Panic
Comorbidity
Cognition
Anxiety
Age of Onset
Emotions
Depressive Disorder
Arousal
Anxiety Disorders
Psychiatry
Young Adult
Outpatients
Age Groups
Regression Analysis
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Aging and Panic Disorder : Phenomenology, Comorbidity, and Risk Factors. / Sheikh, Javaid; Swales, Pamela J.; Carlson, Eve B.; Lindley, Steve E.

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2004, p. 102-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sheikh, Javaid ; Swales, Pamela J. ; Carlson, Eve B. ; Lindley, Steve E. / Aging and Panic Disorder : Phenomenology, Comorbidity, and Risk Factors. In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2004 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 102-109.
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