Adipocyte iron regulates adiponectin and insulin sensitivity

J. Scott Gabrielsen, Yan Gao, Judith A. Simcox, Jingyu Huang, David Thorup, Deborah Jones, Robert C. Cooksey, David Gabrielsen, Ted D. Adams, Steven C. Hunt, Paul N. Hopkins, William T. Cefalu, Donald A. McClain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

152 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron overload is associated with increased diabetes risk. We therefore investigated the effect of iron on adiponectin, an insulin-sensitizing adipokine that is decreased in diabetic patients. In humans, normal-range serum ferritin levels were inversely associated with adiponectin, independent of inflammation. Ferritin was increased and adiponectin was decreased in type 2 diabetic and in obese diabetic subjects compared with those in equally obese individuals without metabolic syndrome. Mice fed a high-iron diet and cultured adipocytes treated with iron exhibited decreased adiponectin mRNA and protein. We found that iron negatively regulated adiponectin transcription via FOXO1-mediated repression. Further, loss of the adipocyte iron export channel, ferroportin, in mice resulted in adipocyte iron loading, decreased adiponectin, and insulin resistance. Conversely, organismal iron overload and increased adipocyte ferroportin expression because of hemochromatosis are associated with decreased adipocyte iron, increased adiponectin, improved glucose tolerance, and increased insulin sensitivity. Phlebotomy of humans with impaired glucose tolerance and ferritin values in the highest quartile of normal increased adiponectin and improved glucose tolerance. These findings demonstrate a causal role for iron as a risk factor for metabolic syndrome and a role for adipocytes in modulating metabolism through adiponectin in response to iron stores.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3529-3540
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume122
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Adiponectin
Adipocytes
Insulin Resistance
Iron
Ferritins
Iron Overload
Glucose
Adipokines
Phlebotomy
Glucose Intolerance
Hemochromatosis
Reference Values
Insulin
Diet
Inflammation
Messenger RNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gabrielsen, J. S., Gao, Y., Simcox, J. A., Huang, J., Thorup, D., Jones, D., ... McClain, D. A. (2012). Adipocyte iron regulates adiponectin and insulin sensitivity. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 122(10), 3529-3540. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI44421

Adipocyte iron regulates adiponectin and insulin sensitivity. / Gabrielsen, J. Scott; Gao, Yan; Simcox, Judith A.; Huang, Jingyu; Thorup, David; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Robert C.; Gabrielsen, David; Adams, Ted D.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hopkins, Paul N.; Cefalu, William T.; McClain, Donald A.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 122, No. 10, 01.10.2012, p. 3529-3540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gabrielsen, JS, Gao, Y, Simcox, JA, Huang, J, Thorup, D, Jones, D, Cooksey, RC, Gabrielsen, D, Adams, TD, Hunt, SC, Hopkins, PN, Cefalu, WT & McClain, DA 2012, 'Adipocyte iron regulates adiponectin and insulin sensitivity', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 122, no. 10, pp. 3529-3540. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI44421
Gabrielsen JS, Gao Y, Simcox JA, Huang J, Thorup D, Jones D et al. Adipocyte iron regulates adiponectin and insulin sensitivity. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2012 Oct 1;122(10):3529-3540. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI44421
Gabrielsen, J. Scott ; Gao, Yan ; Simcox, Judith A. ; Huang, Jingyu ; Thorup, David ; Jones, Deborah ; Cooksey, Robert C. ; Gabrielsen, David ; Adams, Ted D. ; Hunt, Steven C. ; Hopkins, Paul N. ; Cefalu, William T. ; McClain, Donald A. / Adipocyte iron regulates adiponectin and insulin sensitivity. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2012 ; Vol. 122, No. 10. pp. 3529-3540.
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