Achievement and friends

Key factors of player retention vary across player levels in online multiplayer games

Kunwoo Park, Meeyoung Cha, Haewoon Kwak, Kuan Ta Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Retaining players over an extended period of time is a longstanding challenge in game industry. Significant effort has been paid to understanding what motivates players enjoy games. While individuals may have varying reasons to play or abandon a game at different stages within the game, previous studies have looked at the retention problem from a snapshot view. This study, by analyzing in-game logs of 51,104 distinct individuals in an online multiplayer game, uniquely offers a multifaceted view of the retention problem over the players' virtual life phases. We find that key indicators of longevity change with the game level. Achievement features are important for players at the initial to the advanced phases, yet social features become the most predictive of longevity once players reach the highest level offered by the game. These findings have theoretical and practical implications for designing online games that are adaptive to meeting the players' needs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication26th International World Wide Web Conference 2017, WWW 2017 Companion
PublisherInternational World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee
Pages445-453
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9781450349147
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019
Event26th International World Wide Web Conference, WWW 2017 Companion - Perth, Australia
Duration: 3 Apr 20177 Apr 2017

Other

Other26th International World Wide Web Conference, WWW 2017 Companion
CountryAustralia
CityPerth
Period3/4/177/4/17

Fingerprint

Industry

Keywords

  • Longevity
  • Online multiplayer games
  • Player level
  • Player retention
  • Virtual life trajectory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Park, K., Cha, M., Kwak, H., & Chen, K. T. (2019). Achievement and friends: Key factors of player retention vary across player levels in online multiplayer games. In 26th International World Wide Web Conference 2017, WWW 2017 Companion (pp. 445-453). International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee. https://doi.org/10.1145/3041021.3054176

Achievement and friends : Key factors of player retention vary across player levels in online multiplayer games. / Park, Kunwoo; Cha, Meeyoung; Kwak, Haewoon; Chen, Kuan Ta.

26th International World Wide Web Conference 2017, WWW 2017 Companion. International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee, 2019. p. 445-453.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Park, K, Cha, M, Kwak, H & Chen, KT 2019, Achievement and friends: Key factors of player retention vary across player levels in online multiplayer games. in 26th International World Wide Web Conference 2017, WWW 2017 Companion. International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee, pp. 445-453, 26th International World Wide Web Conference, WWW 2017 Companion, Perth, Australia, 3/4/17. https://doi.org/10.1145/3041021.3054176
Park K, Cha M, Kwak H, Chen KT. Achievement and friends: Key factors of player retention vary across player levels in online multiplayer games. In 26th International World Wide Web Conference 2017, WWW 2017 Companion. International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee. 2019. p. 445-453 https://doi.org/10.1145/3041021.3054176
Park, Kunwoo ; Cha, Meeyoung ; Kwak, Haewoon ; Chen, Kuan Ta. / Achievement and friends : Key factors of player retention vary across player levels in online multiplayer games. 26th International World Wide Web Conference 2017, WWW 2017 Companion. International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee, 2019. pp. 445-453
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