A preliminary study of aerosolized recombinant human deoxyribonuclease i in the treatment of cystic fibrosis

Richard C. Hubbard, Noel G. Mcelvaney, Peter Birrer, Woodrow W. Robinson, Clara Jolley, Ronald Crystal, Steven Shak, Margaret wu, Milica S. Chernick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

148 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CYSTIC fibrosis is a lethal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, a gene comprising 27 exons and 250 kilobases that resides on chromosome 7.1 2 3 4 5 The most important clinical manifestation of cystic fibrosis is chronic progressive lung disease, which despite aggressive antibiotic therapy and chest physiotherapy, remains the principal cause of disability and death.1 Airway secretions play a major part in the respiratory dysfunction in cystic fibrosis. The secretions are thick, viscous, and difficult to expectorate, and they obstruct airways and contribute to reduced lung volumes and expiratory flow rates.1,2,6 The presence of high.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)812-815
Number of pages4
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume326
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Mar 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Deoxyribonucleases
Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2
Regulator Genes
Lung Diseases
Exons
Fibrosis
Thorax
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Lung
Mutation
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A preliminary study of aerosolized recombinant human deoxyribonuclease i in the treatment of cystic fibrosis. / Hubbard, Richard C.; Mcelvaney, Noel G.; Birrer, Peter; Robinson, Woodrow W.; Jolley, Clara; Crystal, Ronald; Shak, Steven; wu, Margaret; Chernick, Milica S.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 326, No. 12, 19.03.1992, p. 812-815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hubbard, RC, Mcelvaney, NG, Birrer, P, Robinson, WW, Jolley, C, Crystal, R, Shak, S, wu, M & Chernick, MS 1992, 'A preliminary study of aerosolized recombinant human deoxyribonuclease i in the treatment of cystic fibrosis', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 326, no. 12, pp. 812-815. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199203193261207
Hubbard, Richard C. ; Mcelvaney, Noel G. ; Birrer, Peter ; Robinson, Woodrow W. ; Jolley, Clara ; Crystal, Ronald ; Shak, Steven ; wu, Margaret ; Chernick, Milica S. / A preliminary study of aerosolized recombinant human deoxyribonuclease i in the treatment of cystic fibrosis. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1992 ; Vol. 326, No. 12. pp. 812-815.
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