A genomic- and proteomic-based hypothesis on the eclectic effects of systemic interleukin-2 administration in the context of melanoma-specific immunization

Monica C. Panelli, Brian Martin, Dirk Nagorsen, Ena Wang, Kina Smith, Vladia Monsurro, Francesco M. Marincola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among human cancers, melanoma is characterized by an almost unique predisposition to regress in response to immune therapy. Recent clinical studies suggest that the frequency of this favorable event is enhanced by combining T-cell-directed active specific immunization with the systemic administration of interleukin (IL)-2. While waiting for additional clinical experience to confirm this observation, we embraced the working hypothesis that this combination provides superior response rates than either treatment alone. In particular, we have focused our interest on the paradoxical observation that active specific immunization consistently induces circulating CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing in ex vivo assays tumor cells, but cannot induce tumor regression alone. In these settings, it appears that combining the systemic administration of IL-2 is almost an absolute requirement for the induction of clinical responses. Here, we will expand on previous speculations on the postulated mechanism(s) of action of systemic IL-2 administration and, based on original data recently derived through high-throughput transcriptional and post-translational analysis, we will suggest an explanation for the eclectic effects of IL-2 administration in the context of active specific immunization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-131
Number of pages8
JournalCells Tissues Organs
Volume177
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Proteomics
Interleukin-2
Melanoma
Immunization
Vaccination
T-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Chemokines
  • Cytokines
  • Immunization
  • Interleukin-2
  • Melanoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy

Cite this

A genomic- and proteomic-based hypothesis on the eclectic effects of systemic interleukin-2 administration in the context of melanoma-specific immunization. / Panelli, Monica C.; Martin, Brian; Nagorsen, Dirk; Wang, Ena; Smith, Kina; Monsurro, Vladia; Marincola, Francesco M.

In: Cells Tissues Organs, Vol. 177, No. 3, 2004, p. 124-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Panelli, Monica C. ; Martin, Brian ; Nagorsen, Dirk ; Wang, Ena ; Smith, Kina ; Monsurro, Vladia ; Marincola, Francesco M. / A genomic- and proteomic-based hypothesis on the eclectic effects of systemic interleukin-2 administration in the context of melanoma-specific immunization. In: Cells Tissues Organs. 2004 ; Vol. 177, No. 3. pp. 124-131.
@article{8c27ab04cd7d4f9dafb7d110886b80ea,
title = "A genomic- and proteomic-based hypothesis on the eclectic effects of systemic interleukin-2 administration in the context of melanoma-specific immunization",
abstract = "Among human cancers, melanoma is characterized by an almost unique predisposition to regress in response to immune therapy. Recent clinical studies suggest that the frequency of this favorable event is enhanced by combining T-cell-directed active specific immunization with the systemic administration of interleukin (IL)-2. While waiting for additional clinical experience to confirm this observation, we embraced the working hypothesis that this combination provides superior response rates than either treatment alone. In particular, we have focused our interest on the paradoxical observation that active specific immunization consistently induces circulating CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing in ex vivo assays tumor cells, but cannot induce tumor regression alone. In these settings, it appears that combining the systemic administration of IL-2 is almost an absolute requirement for the induction of clinical responses. Here, we will expand on previous speculations on the postulated mechanism(s) of action of systemic IL-2 administration and, based on original data recently derived through high-throughput transcriptional and post-translational analysis, we will suggest an explanation for the eclectic effects of IL-2 administration in the context of active specific immunization.",
keywords = "Chemokines, Cytokines, Immunization, Interleukin-2, Melanoma",
author = "Panelli, {Monica C.} and Brian Martin and Dirk Nagorsen and Ena Wang and Kina Smith and Vladia Monsurro and Marincola, {Francesco M.}",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.1159/000079986",
language = "English",
volume = "177",
pages = "124--131",
journal = "Cells Tissues Organs",
issn = "1422-6405",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A genomic- and proteomic-based hypothesis on the eclectic effects of systemic interleukin-2 administration in the context of melanoma-specific immunization

AU - Panelli, Monica C.

AU - Martin, Brian

AU - Nagorsen, Dirk

AU - Wang, Ena

AU - Smith, Kina

AU - Monsurro, Vladia

AU - Marincola, Francesco M.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Among human cancers, melanoma is characterized by an almost unique predisposition to regress in response to immune therapy. Recent clinical studies suggest that the frequency of this favorable event is enhanced by combining T-cell-directed active specific immunization with the systemic administration of interleukin (IL)-2. While waiting for additional clinical experience to confirm this observation, we embraced the working hypothesis that this combination provides superior response rates than either treatment alone. In particular, we have focused our interest on the paradoxical observation that active specific immunization consistently induces circulating CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing in ex vivo assays tumor cells, but cannot induce tumor regression alone. In these settings, it appears that combining the systemic administration of IL-2 is almost an absolute requirement for the induction of clinical responses. Here, we will expand on previous speculations on the postulated mechanism(s) of action of systemic IL-2 administration and, based on original data recently derived through high-throughput transcriptional and post-translational analysis, we will suggest an explanation for the eclectic effects of IL-2 administration in the context of active specific immunization.

AB - Among human cancers, melanoma is characterized by an almost unique predisposition to regress in response to immune therapy. Recent clinical studies suggest that the frequency of this favorable event is enhanced by combining T-cell-directed active specific immunization with the systemic administration of interleukin (IL)-2. While waiting for additional clinical experience to confirm this observation, we embraced the working hypothesis that this combination provides superior response rates than either treatment alone. In particular, we have focused our interest on the paradoxical observation that active specific immunization consistently induces circulating CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing in ex vivo assays tumor cells, but cannot induce tumor regression alone. In these settings, it appears that combining the systemic administration of IL-2 is almost an absolute requirement for the induction of clinical responses. Here, we will expand on previous speculations on the postulated mechanism(s) of action of systemic IL-2 administration and, based on original data recently derived through high-throughput transcriptional and post-translational analysis, we will suggest an explanation for the eclectic effects of IL-2 administration in the context of active specific immunization.

KW - Chemokines

KW - Cytokines

KW - Immunization

KW - Interleukin-2

KW - Melanoma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4644357717&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4644357717&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000079986

DO - 10.1159/000079986

M3 - Article

C2 - 15388986

AN - SCOPUS:4644357717

VL - 177

SP - 124

EP - 131

JO - Cells Tissues Organs

JF - Cells Tissues Organs

SN - 1422-6405

IS - 3

ER -