12-year trajectory of health-related quality of life in gastric bypass patients versus comparison groups

Ronette L. Kolotkin, Jaewhan Kim, Lance E. Davidson, Ross D. Crosby, Steven Hunt, Ted D. Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Few prospective studies compare long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes between bariatric surgery patients and individuals with severe obesity who do not undergo bariatric surgery. Objectives: This 12-year, prospective study evaluated the trajectory and durability of HRQOL changes in gastric bypass patients (surgery group; n = 418) and compared these changes to 2 nonsurgical groups. The nonsurgery group 1 (n = 417) sought but did not have surgery; nonsurgery group 2 (n = 321) had severe obesity but did not seek surgery. Setting: Bariatric surgery center. Methods: Weight-related (impact of weight on quality of life-lite [IWQOL-Lite]) and general (short-form health survey-36 [SF-36]) HRQOL questionnaires were administered at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 years postsurgery. Results: At 12 years, the surgery group showed greatly improved weight-related HRQOL (IWQOL-Lite) and physical HRQOL (physical component summary of short-form health survey-36) from baseline, and differences between the surgery group and both nonsurgery groups were significant for IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary. IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary scores peaked at 2 years, followed by declines from 2 to 6 and 6 to 12 years. Small improvements in mental/psychosocial aspects of HRQOL (mental component summary of short-form health survey-36) seen in the surgery group at 2 years were not maintained at either 6 or 12 years. Conclusions: Gastric bypass patients demonstrated significantly higher weight-related and physical HRQOL at 12 years compared with their very low baseline scores, with the trajectory peaking at 2 years. Despite declining HRQOL between 2 and 12 years, the magnitude of improvement supports the clinical relevance of bariatric surgery for enhancing patients’ quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSurgery for Obesity and Related Diseases
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Gastric Bypass
Quality of Life
Bariatric Surgery
Weights and Measures
Health Surveys
Morbid Obesity
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Cohort trial
  • Gastric bypass surgery
  • Health-related quality of life (HRQOL)
  • Impact of weight on quality of life-lite (IWQOL-Lite)
  • Short-form health survey-36 (SF-36)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

12-year trajectory of health-related quality of life in gastric bypass patients versus comparison groups. / Kolotkin, Ronette L.; Kim, Jaewhan; Davidson, Lance E.; Crosby, Ross D.; Hunt, Steven; Adams, Ted D.

In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kolotkin, Ronette L. ; Kim, Jaewhan ; Davidson, Lance E. ; Crosby, Ross D. ; Hunt, Steven ; Adams, Ted D. / 12-year trajectory of health-related quality of life in gastric bypass patients versus comparison groups. In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. 2018.
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abstract = "Background: Few prospective studies compare long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes between bariatric surgery patients and individuals with severe obesity who do not undergo bariatric surgery. Objectives: This 12-year, prospective study evaluated the trajectory and durability of HRQOL changes in gastric bypass patients (surgery group; n = 418) and compared these changes to 2 nonsurgical groups. The nonsurgery group 1 (n = 417) sought but did not have surgery; nonsurgery group 2 (n = 321) had severe obesity but did not seek surgery. Setting: Bariatric surgery center. Methods: Weight-related (impact of weight on quality of life-lite [IWQOL-Lite]) and general (short-form health survey-36 [SF-36]) HRQOL questionnaires were administered at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 years postsurgery. Results: At 12 years, the surgery group showed greatly improved weight-related HRQOL (IWQOL-Lite) and physical HRQOL (physical component summary of short-form health survey-36) from baseline, and differences between the surgery group and both nonsurgery groups were significant for IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary. IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary scores peaked at 2 years, followed by declines from 2 to 6 and 6 to 12 years. Small improvements in mental/psychosocial aspects of HRQOL (mental component summary of short-form health survey-36) seen in the surgery group at 2 years were not maintained at either 6 or 12 years. Conclusions: Gastric bypass patients demonstrated significantly higher weight-related and physical HRQOL at 12 years compared with their very low baseline scores, with the trajectory peaking at 2 years. Despite declining HRQOL between 2 and 12 years, the magnitude of improvement supports the clinical relevance of bariatric surgery for enhancing patients’ quality of life.",
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AB - Background: Few prospective studies compare long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes between bariatric surgery patients and individuals with severe obesity who do not undergo bariatric surgery. Objectives: This 12-year, prospective study evaluated the trajectory and durability of HRQOL changes in gastric bypass patients (surgery group; n = 418) and compared these changes to 2 nonsurgical groups. The nonsurgery group 1 (n = 417) sought but did not have surgery; nonsurgery group 2 (n = 321) had severe obesity but did not seek surgery. Setting: Bariatric surgery center. Methods: Weight-related (impact of weight on quality of life-lite [IWQOL-Lite]) and general (short-form health survey-36 [SF-36]) HRQOL questionnaires were administered at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 years postsurgery. Results: At 12 years, the surgery group showed greatly improved weight-related HRQOL (IWQOL-Lite) and physical HRQOL (physical component summary of short-form health survey-36) from baseline, and differences between the surgery group and both nonsurgery groups were significant for IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary. IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary scores peaked at 2 years, followed by declines from 2 to 6 and 6 to 12 years. Small improvements in mental/psychosocial aspects of HRQOL (mental component summary of short-form health survey-36) seen in the surgery group at 2 years were not maintained at either 6 or 12 years. Conclusions: Gastric bypass patients demonstrated significantly higher weight-related and physical HRQOL at 12 years compared with their very low baseline scores, with the trajectory peaking at 2 years. Despite declining HRQOL between 2 and 12 years, the magnitude of improvement supports the clinical relevance of bariatric surgery for enhancing patients’ quality of life.

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KW - Short-form health survey-36 (SF-36)

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