12-year trajectory of health-related quality of life in gastric bypass patients versus comparison groups

Ronette L. Kolotkin, Jaewhan Kim, Lance E. Davidson, Ross D. Crosby, Steven Hunt, Ted D. Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Few prospective studies compare long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes between bariatric surgery patients and individuals with severe obesity who do not undergo bariatric surgery. Objectives: This 12-year, prospective study evaluated the trajectory and durability of HRQOL changes in gastric bypass patients (surgery group; n = 418) and compared these changes to 2 nonsurgical groups. The nonsurgery group 1 (n = 417) sought but did not have surgery; nonsurgery group 2 (n = 321) had severe obesity but did not seek surgery. Setting: Bariatric surgery center. Methods: Weight-related (impact of weight on quality of life-lite [IWQOL-Lite]) and general (short-form health survey-36 [SF-36]) HRQOL questionnaires were administered at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 years postsurgery. Results: At 12 years, the surgery group showed greatly improved weight-related HRQOL (IWQOL-Lite) and physical HRQOL (physical component summary of short-form health survey-36) from baseline, and differences between the surgery group and both nonsurgery groups were significant for IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary. IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary scores peaked at 2 years, followed by declines from 2 to 6 and 6 to 12 years. Small improvements in mental/psychosocial aspects of HRQOL (mental component summary of short-form health survey-36) seen in the surgery group at 2 years were not maintained at either 6 or 12 years. Conclusions: Gastric bypass patients demonstrated significantly higher weight-related and physical HRQOL at 12 years compared with their very low baseline scores, with the trajectory peaking at 2 years. Despite declining HRQOL between 2 and 12 years, the magnitude of improvement supports the clinical relevance of bariatric surgery for enhancing patients’ quality of life.

LanguageEnglish
JournalSurgery for Obesity and Related Diseases
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

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Gastric Bypass
Quality of Life
Bariatric Surgery
Weights and Measures
Health Surveys
Morbid Obesity
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Cohort trial
  • Gastric bypass surgery
  • Health-related quality of life (HRQOL)
  • Impact of weight on quality of life-lite (IWQOL-Lite)
  • Short-form health survey-36 (SF-36)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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12-year trajectory of health-related quality of life in gastric bypass patients versus comparison groups. / Kolotkin, Ronette L.; Kim, Jaewhan; Davidson, Lance E.; Crosby, Ross D.; Hunt, Steven; Adams, Ted D.

In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kolotkin, Ronette L. ; Kim, Jaewhan ; Davidson, Lance E. ; Crosby, Ross D. ; Hunt, Steven ; Adams, Ted D. / 12-year trajectory of health-related quality of life in gastric bypass patients versus comparison groups. In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. 2018.
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abstract = "Background: Few prospective studies compare long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes between bariatric surgery patients and individuals with severe obesity who do not undergo bariatric surgery. Objectives: This 12-year, prospective study evaluated the trajectory and durability of HRQOL changes in gastric bypass patients (surgery group; n = 418) and compared these changes to 2 nonsurgical groups. The nonsurgery group 1 (n = 417) sought but did not have surgery; nonsurgery group 2 (n = 321) had severe obesity but did not seek surgery. Setting: Bariatric surgery center. Methods: Weight-related (impact of weight on quality of life-lite [IWQOL-Lite]) and general (short-form health survey-36 [SF-36]) HRQOL questionnaires were administered at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 years postsurgery. Results: At 12 years, the surgery group showed greatly improved weight-related HRQOL (IWQOL-Lite) and physical HRQOL (physical component summary of short-form health survey-36) from baseline, and differences between the surgery group and both nonsurgery groups were significant for IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary. IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary scores peaked at 2 years, followed by declines from 2 to 6 and 6 to 12 years. Small improvements in mental/psychosocial aspects of HRQOL (mental component summary of short-form health survey-36) seen in the surgery group at 2 years were not maintained at either 6 or 12 years. Conclusions: Gastric bypass patients demonstrated significantly higher weight-related and physical HRQOL at 12 years compared with their very low baseline scores, with the trajectory peaking at 2 years. Despite declining HRQOL between 2 and 12 years, the magnitude of improvement supports the clinical relevance of bariatric surgery for enhancing patients’ quality of life.",
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AB - Background: Few prospective studies compare long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes between bariatric surgery patients and individuals with severe obesity who do not undergo bariatric surgery. Objectives: This 12-year, prospective study evaluated the trajectory and durability of HRQOL changes in gastric bypass patients (surgery group; n = 418) and compared these changes to 2 nonsurgical groups. The nonsurgery group 1 (n = 417) sought but did not have surgery; nonsurgery group 2 (n = 321) had severe obesity but did not seek surgery. Setting: Bariatric surgery center. Methods: Weight-related (impact of weight on quality of life-lite [IWQOL-Lite]) and general (short-form health survey-36 [SF-36]) HRQOL questionnaires were administered at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 years postsurgery. Results: At 12 years, the surgery group showed greatly improved weight-related HRQOL (IWQOL-Lite) and physical HRQOL (physical component summary of short-form health survey-36) from baseline, and differences between the surgery group and both nonsurgery groups were significant for IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary. IWQOL-Lite and physical component summary scores peaked at 2 years, followed by declines from 2 to 6 and 6 to 12 years. Small improvements in mental/psychosocial aspects of HRQOL (mental component summary of short-form health survey-36) seen in the surgery group at 2 years were not maintained at either 6 or 12 years. Conclusions: Gastric bypass patients demonstrated significantly higher weight-related and physical HRQOL at 12 years compared with their very low baseline scores, with the trajectory peaking at 2 years. Despite declining HRQOL between 2 and 12 years, the magnitude of improvement supports the clinical relevance of bariatric surgery for enhancing patients’ quality of life.

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